A Basterd For All Seasons
badolescents:

THANK YOU!

badolescents:

THANK YOU!

fuckyeahpolystyrene:

Poly Styrene

Me and Infinite Jest, why has no one I know read that damn book!

Me and Infinite Jest, why has no one I know read that damn book!

I’m in this mood and Hasil Adkins is hitting the spot, enjoy some goods tunes kiddos!

Hasil Adkins - Gone Gone Gone

Hasil Adkins
"Gone Gone Gone"
What The Hell Was I Thinking

Hasil Adkins - You're Gonna Break My Heart

Hasil Adkins
"You’re Gonna Break My Heart"
Peanut Butter Rock adn Roll

prochoiceamerica:

Don’t be fooled: The same groups that pushed Colorado’s two failed “personhood” ballot measures are behind this anti-choice initiative. Their goal is still to ban abortion. http://nar.al/2de

prochoiceamerica:

Don’t be fooled: The same groups that pushed Colorado’s two failed “personhood” ballot measures are behind this anti-choice initiative. Their goal is still to ban abortion. http://nar.al/2de

So this is from beckittns.  A tumblr dedicated to pictures of cats with random Samuel Beckett quotes.  I’m highly amused

So this is from beckittns.  A tumblr dedicated to pictures of cats with random Samuel Beckett quotes.  I’m highly amused

truckstopstruckstop:

FREAKS promo pin. Unauthenticated.

truckstopstruckstop:

FREAKS promo pin. Unauthenticated.

rimbaudwasademonchild:


The Cramps photographed by Youri Lenquette, 1987.
via
She prayed for me because she believed I was blind to sin, wanting me to kneel and pray too, because people to whom sin is just a matter of words, to them salvation is just words too.
William Faulkner, As I Lay Dying (via deaths-and-entrances)

this

(via mermaidsbite)

via bookpatrol:

Self-Portraits by Pierre Beteille: Bringing Good Books to Life  

French photographer Pierre Beteille  has produced a series of self portraits where, with a little digital magic, the text and the reader morph into some pretty cool imagery. From  Robinson Crusoe to Charles Bukowski’s Notes of a Dirty Old Man and plenty in between enjoy this trip through Beteille’s reading life.

See the rest of the portfolio at 500px ISO

h/t Shelf Awareness

theenergyissue:

The “Bomb Ponds” of the Vietnam War

Between 1964 and 1975, 2,756,941 tons of explosives were dropped by the U.S. military across Cambodia. As historian Thomas J. Campanella notes in Design Observer, “in Quang Binh and Vinh Linh provinces (just north and south of the former demilitarized zone) the landscape resembles the face of the moon, with craters 30 to 50 feet in diameter and several yards deep.” The massive pock marks, today called “bomb ponds” in Cambodian, testify to the ambiguous heritage of these war scars. On the one hand, they have become a naturalized part of the landscape: villagers have transformed the bomb craters into ponds for growing fish, a staple of the Vietnamese diet, and in the south, bomb craters are favored sites for houses with a replenishable source of protein at the doorstep. Yet the water in these “ponds” are often still toxic, a reminder of their violent origins. In fact, a culture of silence has left this history largely unspoken. In America, there is little recognition of the bombing and in Cambodia, a reluctance to educate its youth about the history surrounding the Khmer Rouge regime. In order to bring attention back to this era and its looming effects, self-taught photographer Vandy Rattana documented these sites in 2009 as physical evidence of a history kept silent. The resulting series, “Bomb Ponds,” was exhibited at Documenta13.

Ignoring punctuation, spacing, and capitalization, a monkey typing letters uniformly at random has a chance of one in 26 of correctly typing the first letter of Hamlet. It has a chance of one in 676 (26 × 26) of typing the first two letters. Because the probability shrinks exponentially, at 20 letters it already has only a chance of one in 2620 = 19,928,148,895,209,409,152,340,197,376 (almost 2 × 1028). In the case of the entire text of Hamlet, the probabilities are so vanishingly small they can barely be conceived in human terms. The text of Hamlet contains approximately 130,000 letters.[note 3] Thus there is a probability of one in 3.4 × 10183,946 to get the text right at the first trial. The average number of letters that needs to be typed until the text appears is also 3.4 × 10183,946,[note 4] or including punctuation, 4.4 × 10360,783.[note 5]

Even if every proton in the observable universe were a monkey with a typewriter, typing from the Big Bang until the end of the universe (when protons no longer exist), they would still need a ridiculously longer time - more than three hundred and sixty thousand orders of magnitude longer - to have even a 1 in 10500 chance of success. To put it another way, for a one in a trillion chance of success, there would need to be 10360,641 universes made of atomic monkeys.[note 6] As Kittel and Kroemer put it, “The probability of Hamlet is therefore zero in any operational sense of an event…”, and the statement that the monkeys must eventually succeed “gives a misleading conclusion about very, very large numbers.” This is from their textbook on thermodynamics, the field whose statistical foundations motivated the first known expositions of typing monkeys.[3]

In fact there is less than a one in a trillion chance of success that such a universe made of monkeys could type any particular document a mere 79 characters long.[note 7]